JLI New Policy Brief- Faith Actors and Global Compact on Refugees

To maximize the significant opportunities presented by the Global Compact on Refugees (GCR), the international community must recognize the experience and capabilities of faith actors (FAs) and break down existing barriers to partnerships to enable a more comprehensive, effective, and durable response.

While the GCR does acknowledge that: “Faith-based actors could support the planning and delivery of arrangements to assist refugees and host communities, including in the areas of conflict prevention, reconciliation, and peacebuilding, as well as other relevant areas,” the critical and comprehensive role that FAs play – as well as their potential for efficient service delivery – warrants a fuller and more nuanced examination.

The following policy brief provides a set of recommendations based on evidence concerning the multiple roles that faith and faith actors play across different stages and spaces of forced displacement. The brief is aligned with the GCR’s sections on Arrangements for Burden- and Responsibility-sharing and its three Areas in Need of Support (Reception and Admission, Meeting Needs and Supporting Communities, and Solutions)

This brief and corresponding resource brief were funded through the Luce Foundation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read the supporting ‘Resource Brief’ that provides a reading list of articles related to faith, refugees, and the Global Compact

The HERDING project

Sustainable development for pastoralist women in India: heritage, dignity and adaptations in times of rapid change.

Public summary

The HERDING project is funded by the British Academy’s Sustainable Development research programme. The programme, which will run for 20 months from October 2018, brings together a range of research projects that are focusing on the importance of heritage and dignity for ‘sustainable development’. They all contribute to a global pledge to ‘leave no-one behind’ that was made when the Sustainable Development Goals were launched in 2015.

The HERDING project focuses on women in mobile pastoralist communities in India. India has a wide range of ecosystems that support mobile animal husbandry, and is home to about 30 million pastoralists. Rapidly changing patterns of land use, alongside pressures to become sedentary, are challenging pastoralists’ livelihoods as mobile animal husbanders. Many pastoralists are becoming more vulnerable to poverty, and changes are affecting men and women differently.

The HERDING project brings together academic disciplines of gender studies, development studies and the sociological study of religion to study the complex transformations of pastoralist women’s lives. It investigates the role that their beliefs and practices play in constructing a sense of shared heritage that links them to the land and their animals; and how this heritage is changing. It provides an opportunity to for pastoralist women, whose voices are less heard than the voices of men, to speak about the roles and importance to them of religion, gender, culture and nature. It asks: ‘How do pastoralist women in India live, perceive and mobilise aspects of their religio-cultural heritage to lay claim to sustaining livelihoods of dignity within and outside mobile pastoralism?’.

The project works with four communities of Hindu and Muslim pastoralists in Gujarat, Maharashtra and Himachal Pradesh. The project partners are the University of Leeds in the UK, and in India the Centre for Pastoralism and four affiliated NGOs who are specialists in pastoralism, and the promotion of women’s wellbeing and empowerment.

The HERDING project aims to advance a view of sustainable development that honours pastoralists’ heritage, interrupts processes of exclusion, and supports India’s Sustainable Development Goal programming.

 

For further details, please contact Project Team Leader, Professor Caroline Dyer ([email protected]) Co-investigator, Professor Emma Tomalin ([email protected])

Episode 360

Freakonomics interviews David Sutherland, Board Chair for International Care Ministries (ICM) with Economist and Northwestern University, Dean Karlan, Finance Professor at Yale University, James Choi and other guests on ICM randomized controlled trial and the impact of religiosity on economic outcomes in the Philippines.

See below link for podcasts and transcript

Is the Protestant Work Ethic Real? (Ep. 360)

For more on the trial see JLI Webinar and relevant resources here

 

Introduction and discussion moderated by JLI Coordinator, Jean Duff

Guest Speakers:

  • Missionary Approach to Development, Seamus O’Leary, Learning and Development Manager, Misean Cara
  • The fire from above, and the fire from below- Peacebuilding approaches in the Philippines, Rick van der Woud, CEO, Mensen met een Missie

 

 

 

Relevant Resources

Misean Cara Missionary Approach to Development Interventions (MADI)     Misean Cara Brief Missionary Approach to Development Interventions     Missionary Responses to Ebola Virus Crises- Misean Cara

Global Partners Forum

October 16th-19th

 

On October 16-19 the Faith Action for Children on the Move Global Partners Forum will be held in Rome, Italy. The Forum provides a platform to bring together a diverse group of faith-based organisations.

The co-organizers, ACT Alliance, ADRA, Anglican Alliance, Arigatou International, Islamic Relief Worldwide, Joint Learning Initiative on Faith & Local Communities, Mennonite World Conference,  Micah Global, The Salvation Army, Seventh-Day Adventist Church, World Council of Churches, World Evangelical Alliance and World Vision believe that by working together we can end violence against migrant, refugee, and displaced children and their families.

In preparation for the Forum, the co-organizers along with participating partners reviewed the evidence and approaches on how to work as faith actors. Three themes emerged which will shape the programme and the collective action plan:

  • Spiritual support to children and caregivers as a source of healing and resilience
  • Strengthening the continuum of protection for children on the move
  • Building peaceful societies and combating xenophobia

Forum Goals

  • Learn: Compile and analyse current responses of faith communities, the programme approaches we use, best practices, policy frameworks, advocacy efforts and gaps.
  • Exchange: Discern, share, and build consensus among faith groups, alongside decision makers, children and communities on issues related to violence, migration, displacement, and trafficking.
  • Inform: Produce a publication capturing the essence of the process, key issues, and the plan of action to inform, inspire, and equip others into the future.
  • Plan: Plan action to increase awareness, strengthen partnerships, improve delivery, scale up interventions, and influence decision-making.

 

Read the Learning Briefs

Learning Brief: Continuum of Protection for Children          Learning Brief: Spiritual Support          Learning Brief: The role of faith in building peaceful societies and combating xenophobia

We invite you to participate in the forum to bring experiences to share on the three themes, or follow along with with us virtually.

Click the link below for further information about the forum, registration, and accommodations can be found below. Please share the information with other colleagues and institutions which may be interested in participating.

 

 

To see the Children on the Move resource platform here

*please feel free to upload & send additional resources as well

JLI is happy to announce new board members joining the JLI Board of Directors

Catriona Dejean

Catriona Dejean is Tearfund’s Director of Strategy and Impact, and previously headed up the their Impact and Effectiveness Team. Prior to this, she was a consultant in the social enterprise sector, providing advice to UK and international clients. She has also worked for World Vision on development programmes, and at strategy level – predominantly in Latin America. She started her career in environmental consultancy in the private sector. Catriona also served as a trustee for Cafedirect Producers’ Foundation (now Producers’ Direct) – an award-winning fairtrade enterprise, led by farmers across East Africa and Latin America.

 

Christo Greyling

Rev Christo Greyling is the Senior Director for Faith – Advocacy and External Engagement for World Vision International. He was co-responsible for the development of the Channels of Hope methodology which has catalysed nearly 500,000 faith leaders in 45 countries to respond to difficult development issues such as child protection, maternal and child health, HIV and gender. He is passionate to build meaningful partnerships and collaborate with faith based agencies and faith actors to meaningfully contribute towards SDG outcomes and child well-being.

 

Mohammed Shareef

Dr Mohammed Shareef is the Research and Development Manager at the Humanitarian Academy for Development. He is a Fellow of the Royal Asiatic Society (London). He has previously worked for the United Nations and as a Visiting Lecturer in Politics and International Relations of the Middle East at the University of Exeter in the United Kingdom. He is also a former Lecturer in International Relations at the University of Sulaimani in Iraqi Kurdistan. Shareef completed his PhD in International Relations at the University of Durham and has an MSc in International Relations from the University of Bristol in the United Kingdom.

 

Thanks and best wishes to Hiruy Teka from Samaritan’s Purse and Lucas Koach from Food for the Hungry who will be leaving the JLI Board of Directors.

 

Learn more about the JLI Leadership

Religion and Sustainable Development Goals Webinar

Agenda

  • Keeping the Faith in 2030: Religion and the Sustainable Development Goals (Dr Emma Tomalin and Dr Jörg Haustein)
  • Sustainable Development Goals Indicators and Best Practise Guidelines for FBOs & LFCs (Major (Dr) Elizabeth Garland)
  • Discussion and response moderated by Dr Olivia Wilkinson, JLI and Andrea Kaufmann, World Vision International

If you have any follow up questions, please feel free to email [email protected]

Discussion questions included

  • Many faith actors don’t want to be seen as FBOs but rather as non-state actors. Is this simply a development trend?
  • The preliminary observations suggest that instrumentalization of FBOs for SDG will not work. What would you say would be a good alternative approach rather than instrumentalization?

Webinar slides:

JLI SDG Webinar 6-18 Slides

Relevant Resources:

About the speakers:

  • Dr Jörg Haustein is Senior Lecturer in Religions in Africa at SOAS with a focus on Christianity and Islam. He has a special interest in the historical intersection of religion and development in colonial and post-colonial Africa and its effects on the present. Jörg Haustein is Co-Investigator of the AHRC-funded research network ‘Keeping Faith in 2030: Religions and the Sustainable Development Goals’.

 

  • Major (Dr) Elizabeth Garland is Impact Measurement Learning Coordinator and International Statistician at The Salvation Army International Headquarters. Major (Dr) Garland has worked in a number of settings within the Salvation Army in both Australia and overseas. Overseas appointments include Ghana, Zimbabwe and Southern Africa. Whilst overseas, Major Garland completed further degrees in health, including a Master of Primary Health Care and Master of Health and International development (Flinders University Australia). Major Garland completed and was conferred a Doctorate of Public Health (Flinders University Australia) in 2015.Currently Major (Dr) Garland is working at the International Headquarters of the Salvation Army in London as the Impact Measurement Learning Co-Ordinator and International Statistician. Part of this work is developing ways of measuring The Salvation Army’s work and ministries across the world. This work includes how we measure the Salvation Army’s programmes and activities in relation to the Sustainable Development Goals.

Religious and Faith-based Contributions to the Well-being of Children

The Joint Learning Initiative on Faith and Local Communities (JLI) is pleased to announce the initiation of a partnership with UNICEF over the next three years. The project, titled “Faith for Social and Behaviour Change Initiative” is a collaboration with the UNICEF Communication for Development in Programme Division and the Civil Society Partnerships Unit in the Division of Communication. The research aims to generate knowledge on the specific roles, caveats, effective strategies and demonstrated impact of faith-based organizations in social and behaviour change. The project will look across sectors including health, development, protection and empowerment of children, especially focusing on the most marginalized, across the life-cycle.

Project activities in 2018 will include a literature review, country-specific case studies, content review, and mapping culminating in the translation of this evidence into a conceptual framework and models for systematic engagement with FBOs at scale for social and behavior change. The partners will collaborate with Religions for Peace to hold a multi-country consultation in Bangkok in July to input into the programmatic framework.

Dr. Olivia Wilkinson, JLI Director of Research, will oversee the research work focused on evidence generation, development of programming frameworks, and provision of technical support for engagement of FBOs in social and behavior change communications. Jean Duff, JLI Coordinator will provide guidance on the conceptual framework for scaling up collaboration with the faith community for impact on the well-being of children. Stacy Nam, JLI Knowledge Manager, will support the research and promote collaboration with relevant JLI Learning Hubs and facilitate a “whole of JLI network” engagement in this project.

For more information please contact the Joint Learning Initiative’s Director of Research, Dr. Olivia Wilkinson at [email protected]

The Center for Faith and the Common Good (CFCG) is pleased to announce the receipt of a grant from the Henry Luce Foundation’s Program on Religion in International Affairs, to be carried out by The Joint Learning Initiative on Faith and Local Communities (JLI). The project, titled “Religion, Refugees, and Forced Migration: Making Research-informed Impact in Global Policy Processes” will be in collaboration with Dr. Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh at University College London and with the support of Atallah Fitzgibbon at Islamic Relief Worldwide, the co-chairs of the JLI Refugees and Forced Migration Learning Hub. Dr. Olivia Wilkinson, JLI Director of Research, will oversee the work focused on the translation of research for impact on policy and practice.

Project activities will include the production of policy guidelines and annotated bibliographies that synchronize existing research on faith and refugees with the three main themes of the programme of action for the Global Compact on Refugees (reception and admission, meeting needs and supporting communities, durable solutions). Other activities will focus on outreach through newspaper articles, podcast episodes, infographics, press releases, media packs, and social media messaging. To ensure that these activities reach the right people, the researchers will also undertake a mapping exercise of key influencers and then arrange a series of consultations and briefings to reach out to specific groups in global hubs of decision making and activity on refugee response. Briefings are planned in New York around the General Assembly in September as well as in Geneva, and Beirut or Amman.

These research translation activities will coincide with the final stages of the development and the adoption of the Global Compact on Refugees. They will help to inform new audiences in the humanitarian and development field of the existing and growing evidence base on religious belief, practice, and faith-based work related to refugees.

For more information please contact the Joint Learning Initiative’s Director of Research, Dr. Olivia Wilkinson at [email protected].

 

Progress

 

 

 

 

See Police Brief and Resource Brief

JLI Webinar: Marking the Global Compact. See video recap here

 

Event Date

Monday 12 March

  • Women of Faith Speaking to Structural Change: Empowering Rural Women
    Temple of Understanding (Armenian Convention Center, Guild Hall)
  • Empowerment Stories and Interfaith Actions, United Religions Initiative (URI) (Armenian Convention Center, Guild Hall)

Tuesday 13 March

Wednesday 14 March

  • Faith and Feminism: Voices of Affirmation National Public Radio (NPR) Interview with Randy Cohen – Person, Place (Must RSVP)
  • 8:30 am: Frontline Leadership: Rural Women in the Anti-Fracking Movement, Mining Working Group (Salvation Army,  221 E. 52nd Street)

Thursday 15 March

Friday 16, March

  • 10am: Launching the Global Consultation on the Islamic Gender Justice Declaration, Islamic Relief Worldwide (RSVP Required)
  • 12:15pm: Policy Roundtable of the Faith-Based Community of Praxis on Gender Justice, ACT Alliance (Invite only)
  • 6pm: 4th Annual CSW Interfaith Service of Remembrance and Gratitude, . Sponsored by United
    Methodist Women, NGO CSW, URI, Parliament of the World’s Religions, Temple of Understanding, International Federation of Women in Legal Careers (Church Center for the
    United Nations, Tillman Chapel 44th St and 1st Ave)

Monday 19, March

  • 10am: Building Bridges: developing effective partnerships between faith and secular actors to
    challenge discriminatory gender norms and secure rural women’s rights. Co-sponsors: Danish Mission, ACT Alliance, UNFPA (Ex-Press Bar, UN Secretariat (Entrance on East 46th street
    and 1st Avenue)

    • Presentation from JLI GBV Hub
  • 2:30pm: Human Trafficking in America– Risks for women and girls in rural areas and collaborative prevention by Faith-Based Communities, UNICEF USA, Arigatou International, NY Board of Rabbis (Salvation Army  221 E. 52nd Street)

Wednesday 21, March